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Improving CVD Outcomes in Women: Practice Implementation Strategies for Lifestyle Medicine and Cardiovascular Health
Reducing CVD Risk & Health Disparities
In partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, and the Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, ACPM has developed 4 courses focused on reducing cardiovascular disease risk factors among high-risk women, such as high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, obesity, inactivity, diabetes, and smoking. The content does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.
About the Course
This course will provide an overview of managing patients with cardiovascular disease on the spectrum of socioeconomic status, ethnicity/culture, readiness to change, and severity/complexity of common comorbid conditions (such as depression). This course also includes the implementation of WISEWOMAN resources as part of patient management.
Learning Objectives
  • Incorporate a social determinants of health framework into the assessment of patient and family readiness, willingness, and ability to make and sustain health behavior changes consistent with recommendations for the practice of lifestyle medicine. 
  • Describe culturally and linguistically appropriate communication techniques that can effectively engage and empower patients to make lifestyle changes for a positive effect on their health outcomes. 
  • Identify strategies for working collaboratively with community based partners and those members of the healthcare team who can help patients navigate barriers to self-managing their health behaviors and lifestyles.
CDC'S WISEWOMAN PROGRAM
Expert faculty in cardiology, primary care, and family and lifestyle medicine developed the evidence and practice-based content of the new WISEWOMAN lifestyle medicine curriculum modules. The specialized modules include:
  • Review of the latest studies on how lifestyle change can improve hypertension and CVD outcomes. This module will address the balance of lifestyle change and medication management in higher risk patients. 
  • Practical tips for implementing the lessons learned from these studies. Special considerations with regard to diet, physical activity, stress management, and sleep (e.g. salt and hypertension) for these conditions. 
  • Managing patients with cardiovascular disease on the spectrum of socioeconomic status, ethnicity/culture, readiness to change, and severity/complexity of common comorbid conditions (such as depression). Include implementing WISEWOMAN resources as part of patient management. 
  • Case studies of patients who represent typical populations that WISEWOMAN targets
Faculty
Denise White-Perkins, MD, PhD
Senior Staff Physician and Faculty Member
Henry Ford Health System

Dr. White-Perkins is a senior staff physician and faculty member of the Department of Family Medicine at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Michigan. She enjoys a clinical practice at the Detroit Northwest Henry Ford Medical Center where she also teaches residents and medical students. Dr. White-Perkins earned her medical degree and doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Michigan. She completed her residency training at Metro health medical center in Cleveland, Ohio. In her role as Director of the Institute on Multicultural Health she develops innovative research, educational and community based programs aimed at eliminating health and healthcare disparities. Her research interests center around health empowerment, coping styles and the influence of religion on health. Dr. White-Perkins, an assistant clinical professor at Wayne State University, is committed to increasing the cultural sensitivity and responsiveness of health providers and healthcare systems as they care for patients, particularly those in urban underserved communities.
Disclaimer
This module's development was supported by Cooperative Agreement #1U380T000130 between the American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion( NCCDPHP) and the Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention (DHDSP). The content does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.
Summary
Availability: On-Demand
Available Aug 02, 2017 to Aug 02, 2020
Cost: Non-Member: $41.65
Student/Resident Member: $23.30
ACPM Subscriber: $24.94
Member: $33.25
Credit Offered: 1 CME Credit
1 MOC Point
Contains: 2 Courses
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American College of Preventive Medicine
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