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2018 Healthy Aging Summit
About the 2018 Healthy Aging Summit
Now is the time to examine the critical factors that contribute to healthy aging and empower the next generation of older adults. In 2015, the U.S. population included an estimated 47.8 million people age 65 and older. By 2060, people in this age group will comprise nearly one in four U.S. residents. The growth of this population is one of the most significant shifts in demographic trends in the history of our country, with an influx of baby boomers—people born between 1946 and 1964—making this age group the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population. The Summit will focus on keeping Americans healthy as they transition into older adulthood and maximizing the health of all older adults through prevention strategies like encouraging healthy lifestyles, planning for aging, improving the use of preventive services, and much more.

Using social determinants of health to focus on healthy aging. What contributes to longer and healthier lives throughout older adulthood? The Summit will highlight interventions, services, supports, and strategies that optimize health and prevent, avert, or delay entry into the healthcare system. Greater understanding of the social, environmental, emotional, and other factors that influence health in the later years of life redefines how we approach aging and can reduce healthcare costs to individuals, families, caregivers, systems, and communities.

Your work is part of this collective effort. The 2018 Healthy Aging Summit seeks broad participation by subject matter experts from diverse disciplines, provider types, and the public-private sectors. We want to learn from subject matter experts first-hand what is working across important areas such as healthcare, transportation, built environment, housing, law and policy, and faith-based partnerships.

The 2018 Healthy Aging Summit goals are to:
  1. Explore the science on healthy aging;
  2. Identify knowledge gaps;
  3. Promote prevention; and
  4. Support people aging in place and in their community.
Tracks and Themes
Using social determinants of health to focus on healthy aging.

What contributes to longer and healthier lives throughout older adulthood? The Summit will highlight interventions, services, supports, and strategies that optimize health and prevent, avert, or delay entry into the healthcare system. Greater understanding of the social, environmental, emotional, and other factors that influence health in the later years of life redefines how we approach aging and can reduce healthcare costs to individuals, families, caregivers, systems, and communities. The Summit will highlight these factors through the following meeting tracks:
  • Social and Community Context 
  • Maximizing Quality of Life 
  • Health and Health Care 
  • Neighborhood and Built Environment
Cross-Cutting Themes
  • Technology and Health IT
  • Health equity and disparities
  • Health literacy and cultural competency
  • Demographic considerations (urban/rural, state/local/tribal)

Track Details
Social and Community Context

Purpose: Identify innovative community-based programs that build engagement, cohesiveness, and resilience, that encourage achievement and maintenance of good health.

Areas of focus:
  • 21st Century Aging
  • Age-friendly communities
  • Aging in place
  • Assistive technology
  • Behavioral health
  • Brain health
  • Care coordination and care transitions
  • Disability
  • Function
  • Home safety, accessibility and aesthetics
  • Intergenerational opportunities
  • Late in life learning
  • Lifestyle factors (e.g. tobacco cessation, alcohol and substance abuse, nutrition and physical activity)
  • Obesity and other primary health challenges
  • Sense of purpose
  • Sleeplessness
  • Social and civic engagement
  • Social engagement and connectedness
  • Spirituality
  • Volunteerism
  • Working longer

Maximizing Quality of Life


Purpose: Highlight opportunities to optimize health and empower full potential throughout the age continuum.

Areas of focus:
  • Advanced care planning
  • Behavioral health (e.g. depression and suicide prevention)
  • Caregiver quality of life
  • Caregiving for spouse/adult child
  • Chronic pain
  • Dementia
  • Disability
  • Economic stability
  • Elder justice
  • Fall prevention
  • Hospice and palliative care
  • Intergenerational issues
  • Lifestyle factors (e.g. tobacco cessation, alcohol and substance abuse, nutrition and physical activity)
  • Nutrition
  • Oral health
  • Physical activity
  • Recreation
  • Shared decision making
  • Stress

Health and Health Care

Purpose: Explore ways that public health and healthcare intersect to promote healthy aging. Showcase how clinicians and other providers are working together with public health professionals to improve older adults’ health and healthcare delivery.

Areas of focus:
  • Brain health
  • Care transitions
  • Caregiver health
  • Community planning
  • Community-based providers
  • Culturally competent care
  • Gender-specific health conditions
  • Health literacy
  • Immune system vulnerability
  • Immunizations
  • Multiple chronic conditions
  • Obesity-related issues
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Paid caregiver workforce
  • Person-centered care
  • Planning for aging
  • Preventive care
  • Self-management strategies (e.g. mediation management, multiple chronic conditions, )
  • Sexual health

Neighborhood and Built Environment


Purpose: Explore innovative approaches in developing environments that support geographically, ethnically, and socially diverse populations. This includes working across multiple sectors and partners.


Areas of focus:
  • Access to health care services and supportive services
  • Age-friendly communities including built environment initiatives
  • Building partnerships with key built environment/urban planners stakeholders
  • Care management and resources
  • Dementia-friendly communities
  • Emergency department and hospital care
  • Emergency preparedness
  • Existing resources and barriers to access
  • Financial security
  • Healthcare and public health workforce
  • Home safety, accessibility, and aesthetics
  • Isolation
  • Long term care facilities, assisted living facilities, continuing care communities, congregate care, NORCs, new models
  • Smart homes and new technology
  • Sustainable communities
  • Transportation
  • Work issues
Summit Partners
Summit partners include the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion and the Office of Women's Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the American College of Preventive Medicine.
Summary
Availability: On-Demand
Cost: Non-Member: $399.00
Student/Resident Member: $230.00
ACPM Subscriber: $230.00
Member: $230.00
Credit Offered: 30 CME Credits
30 MOC Credits
Contains: 4 Courses
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American College of Preventive Medicine
455 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Suite 200; Washington, DC 20001
202-466-2044  ·  info@acpm.org

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