Webinar Recording
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Video Transcription
1:24
Good afternoon and welcome to our webinar on Total Worker Health. I'm Dr. Angela Michelide, Vice President of Programs and Education at the American College of Preventive Medicine.
1:41
The American College of Preventive Medicine is a professional medical society of more than 2,000 physicians dedicated to improving the health and quality of life of individuals,
1:54
families, communities, and populations through disease prevention and health promotion. Our members are licensed medical doctors or doctors of osteopathy who possess expertise
Video Summary
Total Worker Health is an approach that focuses on improving the safety, health, and well-being of workers. It involves designing work environments that promote health and well-being, engaging workers in decision-making processes, and integrating safety and health programs. In a webinar on Total Worker Health, Dr. Casey Chosewood of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) discussed the importance of work in influencing various aspects of our lives, such as income, access to benefits, and overall well-being. He highlighted the risks and hazards associated with certain jobs and industries, including obesity rates among public safety workers and the impact of shift work on health. Dr. Chosewood emphasized the need to address these risks and hazards through interventions such as improving work design, increasing worker engagement, and integrating safety and health programs. He also discussed the links between work and mental health, including the increased rates of burnout and substance use disorders among certain professions, and the need for support and resources to address these issues. Dr. Chosewood provided information on resources available through NIOSH and encouraged healthcare professionals to engage in the total worker health movement.
Keywords
Total Worker Health
safety
health
well-being
work environments
worker engagement
risks and hazards
mental health
NIOSH

American College of Preventive Medicine
1200 First Street NE, Suite 315 - Washington, DC 20002
202-466-2044  ·  info@acpm.org

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